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Your Executor Doesn’t Want to Serve?

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Your Executor may decline to serve.
Your Executor (Personal Representative) may decline to serve if you don’t prepare ahead.

When you’ve finally decided who you trust enough to serve as your Executor (called a Personal Representative in Florida), you’ll need to take the next step. It involves having a conversation with the person about what you’re asking her to do. You’ll need to ask if she is willing, says the Pocono Record in the article “Don’t assume person is willing to be your executor.” People are often flattered at first when they are asked about this role, but if they don’t fully understand the responsibilities they may decide not to serve just when you need them the most.

Once your Executor has agreed to act on your behalf and you have a Last Will and Testament prepared by an estate planning attorney, tell your Executor where your original Will is located. Remember that in addition to knowing where the document is, she’ll also need to have access. If the original Will is kept at home in a fire-proof box or a locked document box, be sure to tell her where the key is located.

If you feel that the Will would be safer in a bank’s safe deposit vault, make sure that your Executor will be able to access the safe deposit box. That may mean adding her to the list of people who have access. After your death, she may be permitted to enter the box with a bank representative solely for the purpose of obtaining the Last Will and Testament – nothing else.  However, you should check with your branch first.

After you die, your Executor (Personal Representative) and your estate’s attorney will file your original Last Will and Testament with the probate court. The judge then issues Letters of Administration (called Letters Testamentary in other states), which says that your Executor has the authority to open the safe deposit box to inventory its contents. The Executor must complete an inventory form and have any personal property found in the safe deposit box appraised at its fair market value as of the date of your death.

To make your Executor’s job easier, create a list of your assets and debts and include information she’ll need to complete her task, such as account numbers, titling, etc. She’ll also need contact information and account numbers for insurance policies (homeowners, car, Medicare supplements, life), veterans’ benefits, pensions, retirement accounts and any other assets.

Some people store their information on their computer. But if your Executor can’t access your computer due to distance, or can’t get into your computer because she doesn’t have your password, you may want to create a hard copy document in addition to keeping the information on your computer.

Taking on the role of an Executor (Personal Representative) is a big job. You can show your appreciation, even after you are gone, by making it easy for your Executor to find all the information she’ll need.

Reference: Pocono Record (May 1, 2019) “Don’t assume person is willing to be your executor”