Not Your Grandfather’s Senior Community

Active senior community
Seniors are seeking more active retirement communities.

One 78-year-old woman wanted to compete in a triathlon, so she headed over to the pool at her retirement community and joined a training team. Another 86-year-old woman logs 10 miles twice a week on one of the same retirement community’s spin bikes. That’s what a senior living community that also offers assisted living and skilled nursing care looks like today, reports considerable.com in the article “The rise of ‘cool’ senior living communities.”

Other communities have been created on or near college campuses, where residents can take classes, attend school concerts or sports games, hang out with students and get care if and when they need it. There are also the upscale high-rises that feel more like resorts or healthcare spas.

Active adult communities for those 55+ are transforming themselves into cool, desirable places to live a busy lifestyle. There are now two of Jimmy Buffett’s “Latitude Margaritaville” communities in Florida and another in South Carolina.

Today’s seniors don’t want a bland community, and their children don’t want to see their parents in one. Senior providers know that if they want to succeed, they must stand out from the competition. They’ve got their eye on the 76 million baby boomers who are prospective residents. They know that these prospects are radically redefining aging, just as they have every other stage of life.

An even bigger challenge — most people want to age in their own homes and not move at all.

More senior living communities are also offering opportunities for residents to interact with people of all ages. One community has programs for all ages, a Saturday pop-up café, and more than 40 organizations meet at the center regularly. The community has positioned itself as a gathering place for all members, young and old, to combat isolation and bring people together.

Some retirement communities are built on properties that are mixed-use with the same purpose of not isolating seniors. One community in Alabama will have a center for well-being, open to residents and the public, with physicians, nutritionists, wellness coaches, chiropractors and alternative therapies from salt rooms to infrared saunas. A co-working area and research space for partnerships between healthcare providers, local medical schools and universities and biotech companies will be offered.

For those with seawater in their veins, there is a cruise ship that has been retrofitted with more than 600 condo living units. For wine enthusiasts, one company in California’s Sonoma wine country is partnering with a Zen center to build a facility that will offer meditation classes, workshops and retreats, as well as independent and assisted living and memory care.

No matter what your interests are, chances are there’s a new, cool retirement community with your interests and lifestyle in mind.

Reference: considerable.com (May 24, 2019)“The rise of ‘cool’ senior living communities”

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A Solo 401(k) Works for Self-Employed

A Solo 401(k) benefits small business owners
A Solo 401(k) benefits small business owners.

Have you heard about the Solo 401(k)?

Freelancers, gig-workers or solo entrepreneurs have always had a hard time saving for retirement. It takes a tremendous amount of self-discipline to take money that would otherwise go to run a household or pay quarterly taxes and set it aside in a retirement account. Without an automatic withdrawal from a regular pay check, it’s tough. However, there is an option, says Next Avenue in the article “A Retirement Plan for the Self-Employed: The Single 401(k).”

Known as the Solo 401(k), the Self-Employed 401(k), Individual 401(k), or the Single 401(k), this is a retirement plan designed for self-employed people or sole proprietors, and if applicable, also for their spouses. With a Solo 401(k), 100% employee salary deferral of up to $19,000 is permitted in 2019, if you are under 50. If you’re over 50, that number can go up to $25,000. It also allows an employer profit-sharing contribution of up to $56,000 per year, which lets you save even more by being both the employer and an employee of your business.

Using the Solo 401(k) can save you more than $14,000 in taxes per year (that is, assuming a $56,000 contribution and a 25.7% corporate tax rate), while simultaneously offering a loan provision, just in case you need to tap your savings.

Who qualifies for a Solo 401(k)? You have to be truly self-employed, either in your own full-time small business or a part time gig. Your business can be a sole proprietorship, partnership, or corporation, but it can only have no other employees or employees who aren’t eligible to participate in a traditional 401(k). Examples of people who aren’t eligible would be people who are under age 21 or who work fewer than 1,000 hours per year.

The Solo 401(k) works well for a husband/wife partnership or a small business with only part-time employees.

It provides flexibility so that when times are good, you can put away a lot. When times are lean, you can save less. Additional benefits:

  • Reduced taxable income for pre-salary contributions.
  • Built-in profit sharing for maximum savings deductible against business income.
  • The cost of the plan is a deductible expense.
  • Investments grow tax deferred.
  • Higher contribution limits than SEPs and SIMPLE IRAs.

Small business owners don’t have an HR department to rely on, so it’s a good idea to talk with your financial advisor or estate planning attorney about how a Solo 401(k) may work for your long-term retirement and estate plan.

Reference: Next Avenue (May 3, 2019) “A Retirement Plan for the Self-Employed: The Single 401(k).”